China: Bioethics, Trust, and the Challenge of the Market

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(212 Seiten)
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ISBN-13:
9781402067570
Einband:
eBook
Seiten:
212
Autor:
J. Tao Lai Po-wah
Serie:
96, Asian Studies in Bioethics and the Philosophy of Medicine Philosophy and Medicine
eBook Typ:
PDF
eBook Format:
eBook
Kopierschutz:
Adobe DRM [Hard-DRM]
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

This volume provides a unique perspective on the market reforms currently taking place in Chinese health care. The authors come to grips with the changes taking place in Chinese health care and its effect on the traditional doctor-patient relationship.
"This volume provides a unique perspective on the market reforms currently taking place in Chinese health care. The authors come to grips with the changes taking place in Chinese health care and its effect on the traditional doctor-patient relationship, but also its positive effects on the availability and quality of health care particularly in urban areas. In doing so the various authors wrestle with moral, political and social issues deeply ingrained in Chinese culture as well as the perceived practical and moral difficulties associated with the change to a market oriented economy especially in area of health care. This volume should be of particular interest to bioethicists, those interested in contemporary Chinese philosophy, and of course those working in health care policy, Chinese policy, comparative health care policy, or any combination thereof. TOC:Acknowledgments. 1. Introduction: Trust, The Market and Bioethics. 2. Health Care Policy in China. 3. Trust, Profit, Scarcity and Integrity: Confucian Thought and Traditional Morality. 4. The Market and Health Care. Zhizeng Du: Health Care Services, Markets, and the Confucian Moral Tradition: Establishing a Humanistic Health Care Market. 5. Looking to the Future of China: Can Confucius Guide the Health Care Market?"
Acknowledgments.1.Introduction; Trust, The Market and Bioethics.Julia Tao Lai Po-wah:Preface:The Bioethics of Trust; H.T. Engelhardt Jr & Aaron H. Hinkley: An Overview of the Debate; 2. Health Care Policy in China.;Yongfu Cao, Yunling Wang & Linjuan Zheng: Towards a Confucian Approach to Health Care Allocation in China: A Dynamic Geography;Benfu Li & Linying Hu: Trust is the Core of the Physician-Patient Relationship: From the Viewpoint of Traditional Chinese Medical Ethics; Xiao Yong Chen, Tongwei Yang & Xiuqoin Shen: Medical Resources, the Market, and the Development of Private Hospitals in China; H.T.Engelhardt Jr.: China, Beware: What American Health Care has to Learn from Singapore; 3. Trust, Profit, Scarcity and Integrity: Confucian Thought and Traditional Morality. Julia Tao Lai Po-wah: Confucian Foundations of Trust and Responsibility; Ana Iltis: The Pursuit of an Efficient, Sustainable Health Care System in China: The Role of Health Care Organizations; Ruiping Fan: A Reconstructionist Confucian Approach to Chinese Health Care: The Ethical Principles, the Market, and Policy Reforms. 4. The Market and Health Care. Zhizeng Du : Health Care Services, Markets, and the Confucian Moral Tradition: Establishing a Humanistic Health Care Market. Frederic J. Fransen: Markets, Trust, and the Nurturing of a Culture of Responsibility: Implications for Health Care Policy in China; Jeremy R. Garrett: Fostering Professional Virtue in the Market: Reflections on the Challenges Facing Chinese Health Care Reform; 5. Looking to the Future of China: Can Confucius Guide the Health Care Market? Ren-Zong Qui: On the Reform of Health Care Reform; J.T. Ho: Is Singapore's Health Care System Morally Problematic? A Philosophical Analysis.
to the Moral Challenges H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. and Aaron E. Hinkley 1 Taking Finitude Seriously in a Chinese Cultural Context Across the world, health care policy is a moral and political challenge. Few want to die young or to suffer, yet not all the money in the world can deliver physical immortality or a life free of suffering. In addition, health care needs differ. As a result, unless a state coercively forbids those with the desire and means to buy better basic health care to do so, access to medicine will be unequal. No co- try can afford to provide all with the best of care. In countries such as China, there are in addition stark regional differences in the quality and availability of health care, posing additional challenges to public policy-making. Further, in China as elsewhere, the desire to lower morbidity and mortality risks has led to ever more resources being invested in health care. When such investment is supported primarily by funds derived from taxation, an increasing burden is placed on a country’s economy. This is particularly the case as in China with its one-child policy, where the proportion of the elderly population consuming health care is rising. Thesepolicychallengesarecompoundedbymoraldiversity. Defacto,humansdo not share one morality. Instead, they rank cardinal human goods and right-making conditions in different orders, often not sharing an af?rmation of the same goods or views of the right.

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