The 'Black Horror on the Rhine'

Intersections of Race, Nation, Gender and Class in 1920s Germany
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(389 Seiten)
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ISBN-13:
9781137318619
Einband:
eBook
Seiten:
389
Autor:
Iris Wigger
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

This book explores the 'Black Horror' campaign as an important chapter in the popularisation of racialised discourse in European history. Originating in early 1920s Germany, this international racist campaign was promoted through modern media, targeting French occupation troops from colonial Africa on German soil and using stereotypical images of 'racially primitive', sexually depraved black soldiers threatening and raping 'white women' in 1920s Germany to generate widespread public concern about their presence. The campaign became an international phenomenon in Post-WWI Europe, and had followers throughout Europe, the US and Australia. Wigger examines the campaign's combination of race, gender, nation and class as categories of social inclusion and exclusion, which led to the formation of a racist conglomerate of interlinked discriminations. Her book offers readers a rare insight into a widely forgotten chapter of popular racism in Europe, and sets out the benefits of a historically reflexive study of racialised discourse and its intersectionality.
1. Introduction.- 1.1. An 'outrageous humiliation and rape of a highly cultivated white race by a still half barbaric coloured'. Mapping the 'Black Shame' Campaign.- 1.2 A 'propaganda campaign of enormous dimensions' The 'Black Horror' in scholarly debates.- 1.3 A treachery of the 'women's world', 'the People' and 'Race'; The 'Black Shame' discourse as a conglomerate of racist discrimination.- 2 Women's bodies, alien bodies and the racial body of the German Volk; The rhetoric structure of the 'Black Shame' Stereotype.- 2.1 A 'violation of the rules of European civilisation'; The 'Black Horror' as international campaign.- 2.2 Spreading the 'völkish spark' of German solidarity; The national dividend of the 'Black Horror'.- 3. Race, Gender, Nation, Class; The social construction of the 'Black Shame'.- 3.1 'Black Shame' and 'White Woman'; Women's bodies as medium of racist discrimination.- 3.2 The 'Black Shame' as the decline of the occident. The fiction of a threatened white race.- 3.3 France's attack on the cultured Nations; The continuation of War with racist means.- 3.4 For the sake of the Fatherland
This book explores the 'Black Horror' campaign as an important chapter in the popularisation of racialised discourse in European history. Originating in early 1920s Germany, this international racist campaign was promoted through modern media, targeting French occupation troops from colonial Africa on German soil and using stereotypical images of 'racially primitive', sexually depraved black soldiers threatening and raping 'white women' in 1920s Germany to generate widespread public concern about their presence. The campaign became an international phenomenon in Post-WWI Europe, and had followers throughout Europe, the US and Australia. Wigger examines the campaign's combination of race, gender, nation and class as categories of social inclusion and exclusion, which led to the formation of a racist conglomerate of interlinked discriminations. Her book offers readers a rare insight into a widely forgotten chapter of popular racism in Europe, and sets out the benefits of a historically reflexive study of racialised discourse and its intersectionality.

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