Race and the Invisible Hand

How White Networks Exclude Black Men from Blue-Collar Jobs
Ebook
(242 Seiten)
  Sofort lieferbar | Lieferzeit:3-5 Tage I
ISBN-13:
9780520937376
Einband:
Ebook
Seiten:
242
Autor:
Deirdre Royster
Serie:
George Gund Foundation Book in African American Studies
eBook Typ:
Adobe Digital Editions
Kopierschutz:
Adobe DRM [Hard-DRM]
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

From the time of Booker T. Washington to today, and William Julius Wilson, the advice dispensed to young black men has invariably been, "Get a trade." Deirdre Royster has put this folk wisdom to an empirical test—and, in Race and the Invisible Hand, exposes the subtleties and discrepancies of a workplace that favors the white job-seeker over the black. At the heart of this study is the question: Is there something about young black men that makes them less desirable as workers than their white peers? And if not, then why do black men trail white men in earnings and employment rates? Royster seeks an answer in the experiences of 25 black and 25 white men who graduated from the same vocational school and sought jobs in the same blue-collar labor market in the early 1990s. After seriously examining the educational performances, work ethics, and values of the black men for unique deficiencies, her study reveals the greatest difference between young black and white men—access to the kinds of contacts that really help in the job search and entry process.
From the time of Booker T. Washington to today, and William Julius Wilson, the advice dispensed to young black men has invariably been, "Get a trade." Deirdre Royster has put this folk wisdom to an empirical test—and, in Race and the Invisible Hand, exposes the subtleties and discrepancies of a workplace that favors the white job-seeker over the black. At the heart of this study is the question: Is there something about young black men that makes them less desirable as workers than their white peers? And if not, then why do black men trail white men in earnings and employment rates? Royster seeks an answer in the experiences of 25 black and 25 white men who graduated from the same vocational school and sought jobs in the same blue-collar labor market in the early 1990s. After seriously examining the educational performances, work ethics, and values of the black men for unique deficiencies, her study reveals the greatest difference between young black and white men—access to the kinds of contacts that really help in the job search and entry process.
List of TablesForewordAcknowledgments1. Introduction2. "Invisible" and Visible Hands: Racial Disparity in the Labor Market3. From School to Work . . . in Black and White: A Case Study4. Getting a Job, Not Getting a Job: Employment Divergence Begins5. Evaluating Market Explanations: The Declining Significance of Race and Racial Deficits Approaches6. Embedded Transitions: School Ties and the Unanticipated Significance of Race7. Networks of Inclusion, Networks of Exclusion: The Production and Maintenance of Segregated Opportunity Structures8. White Privilege and Black Accommodation: Where Past and Contemporary Discrimination ConvergeAppendix: Subjects' Occupations at the Time of the StudyNotesBibliographyIndex
From the time of Booker T. Washington to today, and William Julius Wilson, the advice dispensed to young black men has invariably been, "Get a trade." Deirdre Royster has put this folk wisdom to an empirical test-and, in Race and the Invisible Hand, exposes the subtleties and discrepancies of a workplace that favors the white job-seeker over the black. At the heart of this study is the question: Is there something about young black men that makes them less desirable as workers than their white peers? And if not, then why do black men trail white men in earnings and employment rates? Royster seeks an answer in the experiences of 25 black and 25 white men who graduated from the same vocational school and sought jobs in the same blue-collar labor market in the early 1990s. After seriously examining the educational performances, work ethics, and values of the black men for unique deficiencies, her study reveals the greatest difference between young black and white men-access to the kinds of contacts that really help in the job search and entry process.

Kunden Rezensionen

Zu diesem Artikel ist noch keine Rezension vorhanden.
Helfen sie anderen Besuchern und verfassen Sie selbst eine Rezension.