Loss

The Politics of Mourning
Ebook
(498 Seiten)
  Sofort lieferbar | Lieferzeit:3-5 Tage I
ISBN-13:
9780520936270
Einband:
Ebook
Seiten:
498
Autor:
David Eng
eBook Typ:
PDF
Kopierschutz:
Adobe DRM [Hard-DRM]
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

Taking stock of a century of pervasive loss—of warfare, disease, and political strife—this eloquent book opens a new view on both the past and the future by considering "what is lost" in terms of "what remains." Such a perspective, these essays suggest, engages and reanimates history. Plumbing the cultural and political implications of loss, the authors--political theorists, film and literary critics, museum curators, feminists, psychoanalysts, and AIDS activists--expose the humane and productive possibilities in the workings of witness, memory, and melancholy.Among the sites of loss the authors revisit are slavery, apartheid, genocide, war, diaspora, migration, suicide, and disease. Their subjects range from the Irish Famine and the Ottoman slaughter of Armenians to the aftermath of the Vietnam War and apartheid in South Africa, problems of partial immigration and assimilation, AIDS, and the re-envisioning of leftist movements. In particular, Loss reveals how melancholia can lend meaning and force to notions of activism, ethics, and identity.
Taking stock of a century of pervasive loss—of warfare, disease, and political strife—this eloquent book opens a new view on both the past and the future by considering "what is lost" in terms of "what remains." Such a perspective, these essays suggest, engages and reanimates history. Plumbing the cultural and political implications of loss, the authors--political theorists, film and literary critics, museum curators, feminists, psychoanalysts, and AIDS activists--expose the humane and productive possibilities in the workings of witness, memory, and melancholy.Among the sites of loss the authors revisit are slavery, apartheid, genocide, war, diaspora, migration, suicide, and disease. Their subjects range from the Irish Famine and the Ottoman slaughter of Armenians to the aftermath of the Vietnam War and apartheid in South Africa, problems of partial immigration and assimilation, AIDS, and the re-envisioning of leftist movements. In particular, Loss reveals how melancholia can lend meaning and force to notions of activism, ethics, and identity.
IllustrationsPrefaceIntroduction: Mourning RemainsDavid L. Eng and David KazanjianI. Bodily RemainsReturning the Body without Haunting: Mourning "Nai Phi" and the End of Revolution in ThailandRosalind C. MorrisBlack Mo’nin’Fred MotenAmbiguities of Mourning: Law, Custom, and Testimony of Women before South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation CommissionMark SandersCatastrophic MourningMarc NichanianBetween Genocide and CatastropheDavid Kazanjian and Marc NichanianPassing Shadows: Melancholic Nationality and Black Critical Publicity in Pauline E. Hopkins’s Of One BloodDana LucianoMelancholia and MoralismDouglas CrimpII. Spatial RemainsThe Memory of HungerDavid LloydRemains to Be Seen: Reading the Works of Dean Sameshima and Khanh VoSusette MinMourning Becomes Kitsch: The Aesthetics of Loss in Severo Sarduy’s CobraVilashini CooppanTheorizing the Loss of Land: Griqua Land Claims in Southern Africa, 1874–1998David JohnsonLeft MelancholyCharity ScribnerIII. Ideal RemainsAll Things ShiningKaja SilvermanA Dialogue on Racial MelancholiaDavid L. Eng and Shinhee HanPassing Away: The Unspeakable (Losses) of Postapartheid South AfricaYvette ChristiansëWays of Not Seeing: (En)gendered Optics in Benjamin, Baudelaire, and FreudAlys Eve WeinbaumLegacies of Trauma, Legacies of Activism: ACT UP’s LesbiansAnn CvetkovichResisting Left MelancholiaWendy BrownAfterword: After Loss, What Then?Judith ButlerContributorsIndex

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