Last Segregated Hour

The Memphis Kneel-Ins and the Campaign for Southern Church Desegregation
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ISBN-13:
9780199911011
Einband:
EPUB
Seiten:
0
Autor:
Stephen R. Haynes
eBook Typ:
Adobe Digital Editions
eBook Format:
EPUB
Kopierschutz:
Adobe DRM [Hard-DRM]
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

On Palm Sunday 1964, at the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis, a group of black and white students began a "e;kneel-in"e; to protest the church's policy of segregation, a protest that would continue in one form or another for more than a year and eventually force the church to open its doors to black worshippers. In The Last Segregated Hour, Stephen Haynes tells the story of this dramatic yet little studied tactic which was the strategy of choice for bringing attention to segregationist policies in Southern churches. "e;Kneel-ins"e; involved surprise visits to targeted churches, usually during Easter season, and often resulted in physical standoffs with resistant church people. The spectacle of kneeling worshippers barred from entering churches made for a powerful image that invited both local and national media attention. The Memphis kneel-ins of 1964-65 were unique in that the protesters included white students from the local Presbyterian college (Southwestern, now Rhodes). And because the protesting students presented themselves in groups that were "e;mixed"e; by race and gender, white church members saw the visitations as a hostile provocation and responded with unprecedented efforts to end them. But when Church officials pressured Southwestern president Peyton Rhodes to "e;call off"e; his students or risk financial reprisals, he responded that "e;Southwestern is not for sale."e;Drawing on a wide range of sources, including extensive interviews with the students who led the kneel-ins, Haynes tells an inspiring story that will appeal not only to scholars of religion and history, but also to pastors and church people concerned about fostering racially diverse congregations.
On Palm Sunday 1964, at the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis, a group of black and white students began a "e;kneel-in"e; to protest the church's policy of segregation, a protest that would continue in one form or another for more than a year and eventually force the church to open its doors to black worshippers. In The Last Segregated Hour, Stephen Haynes tells the story of this dramatic yet little studied tactic which was the strategy of choice for bringing attention to segregationist policies in Southern churches. "e;Kneel-ins"e; involved surprise visits to targeted churches, usually during Easter season, and often resulted in physical standoffs with resistant church people. The spectacle of kneeling worshippers barred from entering churches made for a powerful image that invited both local and national media attention. The Memphis kneel-ins of 1964-65 were unique in that the protesters included white students from the local Presbyterian college (Southwestern, now Rhodes). And because the protesting students presented themselves in groups that were "e;mixed"e; by race and gender, white church members saw the visitations as a hostile provocation and responded with unprecedented efforts to end them. But when Church officials pressured Southwestern president Peyton Rhodes to "e;call off"e; his students or risk financial reprisals, he responded that "e;Southwestern is not for sale."e;Drawing on a wide range of sources, including extensive interviews with the students who led the kneel-ins, Haynes tells an inspiring story that will appeal not only to scholars of religion and history, but also to pastors and church people concerned about fostering racially diverse congregations.
Introduction: Segregation's Last Stronghold
Part I: The Forgotten Protests
Chapter One: "The start of a new movement across the South": The First Kneel-Ins, 1960
Chapter Two: "Christ did not build any racial walls": Church Desegregation Campaigns, 1961-65
Part II: Contexts of a Kneel-in Movement
Chapter Three: "This spectacle of a church with guarded doors": The Memphis Campaign of 1964
Chapter Four: "Like a child that had been unfaithful": A Church-Related College and a College-Related Church
Chapter Five: "A time when the bare souls of men are revealed": Southern Presbyterians Respond
Part III: Memories of a Kneel-In Movement
Chapter Six: "You're going to have to go out there yourself": Church People
Chapter Seven: "Our presence at the church is itself an act of worship": White Visitors
Chapter Eight: "You will only know my motivation when you open the door": Black Visitors
Chapter Nine: "Mama, why don't they just let them in?": Children
Part IV: Aftermath of a Kneel-In Movement
Chapter Ten: "The greatest crisis in the 120-year history of our church": Defiance, Intervention and Schism
Chapter Eleven: "Not the church's advantages, but the city's disadvantages": Wrestling with the Past at Second Presbyterian Church
Chapter Twelve: "A season of prayer and corporate repentance": Wrestling with the Past at Independent Presbyterian Church
Epilogue
Notes
Index
On Palm Sunday 1964, at the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis, a group of black and white students began a "kneel-in" to protest the church's policy of segregation, a protest that would continue in one form or another for more than a year and eventually force the church to open its doors to black worshippers.
In The Last Segregated Hour, Stephen Haynes tells the story of this dramatic yet little studied tactic which was the strategy of choice for bringing attention to segregationist policies in Southern churches. "Kneel-ins" involved surprise visits to targeted churches, usually during Easter season, and often resulted in physical standoffs with resistant church people. The spectacle of kneeling worshippers barred from entering churches made for a powerful image that invited both local and national media attention. The Memphis kneel-ins of 1964-65 were unique in that the protesters included white students from the local Presbyterian college (Southwestern, now Rhodes). And because the protesting students presented themselves in groups that were "mixed" by race and gender, white church members saw the visitations as a hostile provocation and responded with unprecedented efforts to end them. But when Church officials pressured Southwestern president Peyton Rhodes to "call off" his students or risk financial reprisals, he responded that "Southwestern is not for sale."

Drawing on a wide range of sources, including extensive interviews with the students who led the kneel-ins, Haynes tells an inspiring story that will appeal not only to scholars of religion and history, but also to pastors and church people concerned about fostering racially diverse congregations.

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