Christ Meets Me Everywhere

Augustine's Early Figurative Exegesis
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ISBN-13:
9780199876938
Einband:
PDF
Seiten:
0
Autor:
Michael Cameron
Serie:
Oxford Studies in Historical Theology
eBook Typ:
PDF
eBook Format:
PDF
Kopierschutz:
Adobe DRM [Hard-DRM]
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

Most readers first encounter Augustine's love for Scripture's words in the many biblical allusions of his masterwork, the Confessions. Augustine does not merely quote texts, but in many ways makes Scripture itself tell the story. In his journey from darkness to light, Augustine becomes Adam in the Garden of Eden, the Prodigal Son of Jesus' parable, and the Pauline double personality at once devoted to and rebellious against God's law. Throughout he speaks the words of the Psalms as if he had written them. Crucial to Augustine's self-portrayal is his skill at transposing himself into the texts. He sees their properties and dynamics as his own, and by extension, every believing reader's own. In Christ Meets Me Everywhere, Michael Cameron argues that Augustine wanted to train readers of Scripture to transpose themselves into the texts in the same way he did, by the same process of figuration that he found at Scripture's core. Augustine discovered this skill by learning to read Scripture as a work of divine rhetoric that mirrors the humility of the human Christ who forms humble readers to ascend its spiritual heights. Tracking Augustine's developing skill in reading Scripture's figures as microcosms of the history of salvation during the first fifteen years of his Christian life, Cameron shows how Christ's self-transposition into Scripture's readers became the key to Augustine's hermeneutics.
Most readers first encounter Augustine's love for Scripture's words in the many biblical allusions of his masterwork, the Confessions. Augustine does not merely quote texts, but in many ways makes Scripture itself tell the story. In his journey from darkness to light, Augustine becomes Adam in the Garden of Eden, the Prodigal Son of Jesus' parable, and the Pauline double personality at once devoted to and rebellious against God's law. Throughout he speaks the words of the Psalms as if he had written them. Crucial to Augustine's self-portrayal is his skill at transposing himself into the texts. He sees their properties and dynamics as his own, and by extension, every believing reader's own. In Christ Meets Me Everywhere, Michael Cameron argues that Augustine wanted to train readers of Scripture to transpose themselves into the texts in the same way he did, by the same process of figuration that he found at Scripture's core. Augustine discovered this skill by learning to read Scripture as a work of divine rhetoric that mirrors the humility of the human Christ who forms humble readers to ascend its spiritual heights. Tracking Augustine's developing skill in reading Scripture's figures as microcosms of the history of salvation during the first fifteen years of his Christian life, Cameron shows how Christ's self-transposition into Scripture's readers became the key to Augustine's hermeneutics.
PrefaceAbbreviations
Introduction: Ask, Seek, Knock: Approaching Augustine's Figurative Reading
Part I: Novice: Rhetor, Convert, Seeker of Wisdom (386-391)
Chapter 1: Eureka! in Milan: When Ambrose Taught Augustine What He Already Knew
Chapter 2: A Thousand Words is Worth A Picture: The Experiment of On Genesis Against the Manichees
Chapter 3: Enigma Variations: Figurative Reading Framework Under Construction
Chapter 4: Book Binder: Christ the Core of Scriptural Unity
Part II: Journeyman: Priest, Apprentice, Student of Paul (391-396)
Chapter 5: Reading Moses in the School of St. Paul: The Apostle and Christology 101
Chapter 6: Hearing Voices: Christ at Prayer ''in the Psalm and on the Cross''
Part III: Master: Teacher, Defender, Pastor of Souls (396-c. 400)
Chapter 7: High and Low on Jacob's Ladder: Reading Scripture from Both Ends in On Christian Teaching and On Instructing Beginners
Chapter 8: The Old Testament as the First Book of the New: Augustine Figures It Out Against Faustus the Manichee
Epilogue: The Astounding Exchange
Tables
Notes
Bibliography
Indexes
Most readers first encounter Augustine's love for Scripture's words in the many biblical allusions of his masterwork, the Confessions. Augustine does not merely quote texts, but in many ways makes Scripture itself tell the story. In his journey from darkness to light, Augustine becomes Adam in the Garden of Eden, the Prodigal Son of Jesus' parable, and the Pauline double personality at once devoted to and rebellious against God's law. Throughout he speaks the words of the Psalms as if he had written them. Crucial to Augustine's self-portrayal is his skill at transposing himself into the texts. He sees their properties and dynamics as his own, and by extension, every believing reader's own. In Christ Meets Me Everywhere, Michael Cameron argues that Augustine wanted to train readers of Scripture to transpose themselves into the texts in the same way he did, by the same process of figuration that he found at Scripture's core. Augustine discovered this skill by learning to read Scripture as a work of divine rhetoric that mirrors the humility of the human Christ who forms humble readers to ascend its spiritual heights. Tracking Augustine's developing skill in reading Scripture's figures as microcosms of the history of salvation during the first fifteen years of his Christian life, Cameron shows how Christ's self-transposition into Scripture's readers became the key to Augustine's hermeneutics.

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